Sermons on Romans

Remembrance Sunday

omans 12:1 After finishing a twenty-year career in the British Army in 2001, Dr. RobertLyman has published widely on the Second World War in Europe, North Africa and Asia. His most recent book is ‘A War of Empires’. He was the historical consultant to the BBC for the VJ Day ceremonies in 2015 and 2020. In this interview and talk he speaks about sacrifice – Christ for us, and us as living sacrifices for God.

Remembrance 2020: Peace with God

Romans 5:1 Every year at Remembrance we give thanks for the peace that we enjoy as a nation, and we remember those whose sacrifice made this peace possible. But it is also an opportunity to reflect on another dimension of peace, which we may perhaps not think about so much, but which is even more important – and that is, peace with God. Why does it matter? And how do we get it?

Peace

Romans 5:1-11 In his VE Day 1945 broadcast King George VI spoke about restoring ‘peace and sanity to a shattered world’.Peace is something we value very highly, and peace is what the Christian message is about – ‘good news of peace through Jesus Christ’. In this talk we consider three dimensions of that peace, and how we can enjoy it

Doubt: 4: Does God love me?

Romans 5:1-11 Does God love me? Sometimes we may be tempted to doubt whether he does because of sin in our lives. At other times it may be because of suffering, when we wonder why God has allowed this to happen to us if he really loves us. This passage shows us where we can find assurance of God’s love at such times.

Reformation 500 (Lunchtime)

Reformation 500 500 years ago, on 31st October, 1517, Martin Luther nailed 95 theses to the door of a church in Wittenberg, kick-starting the Reformation. How should we view those events and their consequences today? Irrelevance? Unfortunate misunderstanding? Or the rediscovery of truths so precious they must never be forgotten?

Reformation 500

Reformation 500 500 years ago, on 31st October, 1517, Martin Luther nailed 95 theses to the door of a church in Wittenberg, kick-starting the Reformation. How should we view those events and their consequences today? Irrelevance? Unfortunate misunderstanding? Or the rediscovery of truths so precious they must never be forgotten?