Sermons on Faith

One Thing in Common:‭ ‬Simon Pilcher‭ & ‬Is belief in Jesus delusional‭?

John‭ ‬20:24-31‭ Simon Pilcher,‭ ‬CEO of M&G Fixed Income manages a pot of‭ ‬£155‭ ‬billion and a staff of‭ ‬280‭ ‬who are current holders of the‭ ‬‘Fixed Income Manager of the Year‭’‬.‭ ‬He is interviewed about his life,‭ ‬work and faith in Jesus,‭ ‬and then speaks on‭ ‬‘Is belief in Jesus delusional‭?‬’

How to be a total loser

Supposing there is a God, and supposing there is an after-life, and supposing God is going to divide the world into those who get to be with God forever, and those who will be excluded, how will he make that call? Most of us have a moral-skyscraper in our minds with Nelson Mandela and Mother Theresa on the top floor, and Robert Mugabe and Jimmy Saville in the basement, and most likely God will draw a line (quite a bit below our floor obviously), and that will be the divider. Come and join us as we consider Jesus’ surprising teaching on this crucial subject.

One thing in common – Sir Jeremy Cooke

The Honourable Mr Justice Cooke is a former Harlequins rugby player and now a High Court Judge. He has judged many high-profile cases, including the Pakistani match-fixing trial in which he condemned their behaviour as “not cricket”. He is vice-chairman of the Lawyers’ Christian Fellowship. Here he is interviewed, and then speaks on: “Does faith fly in the face of the evidence?”

Death and all his friends: Fear

John 11:38-57 Woody Allen once wrote: “Death is absolutely stupefying in its terror…It makes our lives look as irrelevant as waves breaking over the sea shore.” Even those of us who are convinced that there’s something better beyond death, still can find the thought of it very frightening. How can we approach our own deaths joyfully and confidently?

Death and all his friends: Grief

John 11:17-37 Is death just part of “the circle of life” (as the Lion King assures us)? Is it “nothing at all, [just] slipping away into the next room” (as one popular funeral poem puts it)? How are we to think about death? And especially, how are we to find comfort and hope when we experience the deaths of those close to us?